Making students read in teaching Reading: A reflection

Dinesh Dahal

Introduction
Teaching reading in Nepal is still teacher fronted and it is not believed that teaching reading is not possible unless the teacher reads in the class. But I found something very different during my observation of the Intermediate level English Language Learning (ELL) class in the United States. I am impressed to see how reading skill is taught by making the students read in the class, where the teacher’s role is just a facilitator. The SQPRRS (SQEEPERS) and note taking are key techniques adopted to make students engage in active reading process. Based on my observation of the ELL classes in the US and my own experience of teaching English in Nepal, in this post I am sharing how SQPRRS (SQEEPERS) and note taking techniques can be used in teaching English.

Applying SQPRRS for teaching reading
SQPRRS (Squeepers), which stands for Survey, Question, Predict, Read, Respond and Summarize, is one of the effective classroom reading strategies that I noticed the US teachers use in reading classes. I found this technique quite relevant to promote active reading process in a reading class. I learned that this technique is helpful for language teachers to train their students to use cognitive and metacognitive strategies to process non-fiction texts (and even fictions).

S for Survey
First, students are asked to scan (Survey) the text in 2- 3 minutes. They are asked to read the first line of each paragraph, look at the titles, pictures, graphs, captions and words in the bold face or italics.
Q for Question
Next, the students are asked to write 4-5 questions that they will be able to answer after they have finished reading. Students might feel difficult to formulate questions. But the teacher can facilitate them by suggesting some questioning words like what, where, why, etc. The teachers need to make sure if they have written the questions.
P for Predict
Third, the students are asked to make predictions about the text. Predictions can be of two types: one, for fiction – What is the theme of the text? and for nonfiction – What will you learn from this text?
R for Read
Then, the students are asked to read the text in detail. While they are reading, they are asked to look for the answers to their questions and check their predictions. But they will not be allowed to write.
R for Respond
After students finished reading, they are asked to respond to the questions they asked themselves. Here, they will be allowed to correct the predictions if needed.
S for Summarize
Finally, they are asked to write a paragraph summary of the text on a worksheet (the format is presented below) with the teacher’s help.

Applying NOTE-TAKING for teaching reading
NOTE-TAKING is another technique that works very effectively in teaching reading. The students are asked to take a note following the format presented below and to make a 4 squares about the text with the main idea at the center and supporting details in the periphery. And finally they are asked to write a summary and present it.

Conclusion
On my return to Nepal, I would follow these techniques to teach reading at my class. I am also planning to disseminate this idea to my colleagues through workshops and conference presentations. The article is also part of my commitment to share these techniques to other readers. I would appreciate your comments on this post.

Formats of the Worksheets for SQPRRS and Note Taking:
Name: _______________ Roll no. ____ Date: ________

SQPRRS
Survey the text.
What do you see?

Question
Right There
1. ________________________________________________________________________
Think and Search
2. ________________________________________________________________________
Author and Me
3. ____________________________________________________________________________
On My Own
4. ________________________________________________________________________
Write a Prediction about the text.
This will be about….

Read the text
Read with your partner.
a. Partner A read 2-3 sentences. Partner B listen.
b. Partner B explain what partner A read.
c. Partner B read next 2-3 sentences. Partner A listen.
d. Partner A explain what Partner B read.
e. Repeat, asking teacher for help with difficult words or sentences.
Respond: answer the questions that you wrote before you read:
Right There
1. ________________________________________________________________________
Think and Search
2. ________________________________________________________________________
Author and Me
3. ____________________________________________________________________________
On My Own
4. ____________________________________________________________________________

Make a 4-sqqare about the text

Doc1

Write a Summary of the text.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
Format for note taking

Peg no

One comment

  • It is, of course, the way of developing students’ curiosity to read and explore what they can find and how they can interpret. The technique seems to be interesting. And, first, we need to measure our students’ vocabulary strength. What we can’t forget is what techniques native speakers apply in their native land may not turn so fruitful in a foreign land. Yet, it is really praiseworthy to make some hopeful initiative as well as research. Best of Act!

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